In our previous blog, we spoke at length about hay fever and how it can affect people around this time of year. However, sometimes people can confuse hay fever with early symptoms of Asthma, which may lead to some dangerous repercussions. To avoid the dangers of asthma or if you need some refresher tips in order to help you deal with the condition, then read below some tips on how to deal with it, as well as some answers to common questions we get about the condition.

What is Asthma?

Asthma is a long-term disease that can either inflame or narrow the airways in your lungs. It causes many symptoms that can worsen at any time and impair your breathing.

What are the symptoms of asthma?

The main symptom of asthma as said before is the narrowing and contraction, or inflammation of the airways. However because of this, other symptoms and effects may occur, these can include, but are not limited to, wheezing, coughing, chest tightness, or shortness of breath.
Each sufferer may experience different symptoms at different times when the condition appears. Symptoms can become more or less severe over time, depending on how often attacks are experienced.

Can hayfever make asthma worse?

Yes, an itchy, runny or blocked nose, from hay fever, can make the condition harder to control. However, the medication that is used to treat hay fever can also help to improve your asthma symptoms. Products such as nasal spray are effective in treating allergic reactions that may cause an asthma attack.

How is asthma treated?

Depending on your age, and the severity of your condition, asthma can be treated in a variety of different ways.

Reliever inhaler

If you have only mild symptoms, for example, attacks are only started by a known mild trigger, then your GP may just prescribe you a reliever inhaler to help open airways and soothe your breathing

Reliever and Preventer Inhaler

If you're having symptoms more than three times per week, or symptoms are interfering with everyday tasks, you may need a preventer inhaler too. This inhaler is quite self-explanatory as it will attempt to prevent the inflammation of your airways.

LTRA Tablet

If after both inhalers have been provided and you are still getting symptoms then you might be offered a Leukotriene Receptor Antagonist Tablet (LTRA). This is taken every day as well as your preventer inhaler. LTRA tablets help stop lungs from becoming inflamed.

Combination Inhaler

If both LTRA and the inhaler are still not controlling your symptoms, then you may be given a combination inhaler. This contains a preventer and a reliever.

Can asthma be cured?

Unfortunately, asthma cannot be cured. It is a chronic illness and condition that will most likely always affect the airways in and around your lungs. You will need to monitor your symptoms most likely every day in order to be safe and in a healthy condition.

What can trigger an Asthma attack

Each sufferer can have a variety of different triggers, and they can be very hard to spot if you don't note down what you are doing when an attack happens. Some of the main triggers are

Foods - such as dried fruits, potatoes, wine, lemons or limes, or even diagnosed food allergens e.g. milk, eggs, nuts, soy, wheat and fish.

Pollen - As mentioned in a previous blog, pollen is particles produced by a variety of plants. They are carried by the win and can be a huge cause of asthma attacks, especially in the spring and summer months of the year.

Dust - many people who have asthma are also allergic to dust mites. These are microscopic creatures that link to skin flakes shed by humans and pets. To avoid this allergy-triggering asthma, attempt to clean the areas you spend most of your time in to remove all dust.

How do can I get medication for asthma?

We sell medication for asthma through our online store! We also offer a prescription service here in which you can gain a prescription if you have the condition.